Knitting · Reading

Fox in Socks

Fox    Socks    Box    Knox    Knox in box.  Fox in socks.

After my toe-up Ruisseau Socks, I swore off knitting this particular clothes item.  Too fussy.  All that work to complete just one and, of course, one is not enough so you are done but not done.  Then the September Knit Camp project was (you guessed it) SOCKS.  So, ever the practical person (after all why pay for classes and then skip them) I tackled another pair.  Designed by Marie Greene and dubbed Milkshake Socks because this is “An old-fashion recipe for plain socks that you can shake up with your choice of colorful yarns. … Think of your yarn choice like adding flavor to your milkshake.” 

Gauge for Ruisseau required US #1 needles.  My first time working with something that small and my sock learning experience was to continue as Milkshake necessitated a #0 based on my tension and this yarn.  To get a sense of size – pull out a ruler with metric measurements.  A #1 needle is 2.25mm in diameter and the #0 a fraction smaller at 2mm.

New socks.  Two socks.  Whose socks?  Sue’s socks.  Who sews whose socks?  Sue sews Sue’s socks.

No new yarn was purchased for this project as I did a stash dive for this orange-turquoise-gray self-striping skein called Enceladus (one of Saturn’s ice moons).  The color combo was unique to Northfield Yarns and purchased during the 2015 YarnVenture shop hop.  At the time I had yet to knit a pair of socks or even add them to my project queue.  I picked up the exclusive hand dyed skein solely because as it was featured by what I now dub my local yarn store (LYS).

With my Milkshake Socks complete, I think I may really be done with socks – – – Thank you Dr. Suess and Fox in Socks [or not!]

Knitting

Streek

When you begin knitting and, even after years of experience, there is a dread of dropped stitches unraveling your hard work.  After a decade of projects (145 complete or in-progress currently listed on my Ravelry page) I am finally comfortable picking up dropped stockinette stitches or correcting a mistake in knit-n-purl ribbing.  However, the intricate subtleties of stitch structure still elude me and, if the mistake occurs in a well-loved cable project or (heaven forbid) on lace work, I frog back.  So you can imagine my trepidation when the August theme for Knit Camp was:  Streeking. 

Not familiar with that word?  Neither was I.  The primary definition of this transitive verb is to stretch or to extend, coming from 12th century Middle English, chiefly Scotland.  As a modern day knitting technique, steeking is a multi-step process that involves preparing, cutting, and finishing the streeked item.  And yes, I did say “cutting” as in taking a sharp scissors to a perfectly good item and cutting something knit in the round and making it flat.  Right?!?  And I wanted to do this why?

Having committed to a fun year of Knit Camp with Marie Greene and approximately 1,000 other intrepid knitters, I thought why pay for classes and then skip the work.  So I knit the Soundtrack Cowl, a variation on my Soundtrack Sweater, crocheted two steeked columns, added extra back-stitched reinforcement since my HiKoo Sueño is superwash, cut a specifically planned purl column (yikes!), added a decorative binding on each side to seal the raw edges, picked up left and right side stitches to add a Knit 2 – Purl 2 ribbed button band and, finally, added eight remainder buttons.  While I am satisfied with the finished project, I am pretty sure streeking will not become my new go-to knitting technique.